Academic Integrity Policy

Honesty, trust and integrity are vital components of the education process.  The School Board believes that academic honesty and personal integrity are fundamental components of a student's education and character development. The Board expects that students will not cheat, lie, plagiarize or commit other acts of academic dishonesty.

Teachers have a responsibility to emphasize the values of academic integrity. Teachers should proctor quizzes and tests. Teachers should explain to students when collaboration is and is not appropriate on specific assignments completed inside and outside of class and should teach students what plagiarism is and how to properly use and cite primary and secondary sources.

Students and families should understand and act upon the values of academic integrity and should encourage the highest standards of academic behavior from themselves and their peers.

It is assumed that all work completed for a class is original work created for that class, for a specific assignment.

Disciplinary Process for Violations of Academic Integrity

In order to support the District goal of supporting student behavior consistent with the highest standards of Academic Integrity, students who have committed a violation of this policy may either submit to a panel for a hearing and determination of a process for Restorative Justice, or may submit to the Traditional Disciplinary process as outlined below.

In order for the Restorative Justice process to be initiated both the student and his or her parent/guardian must consent. Participation in the Restorative Justice process concedes that the student violated the Academic Integrity Policy and the violation will be recorded in the student’s discipline file. By entering into the Restorative Justice Process, the student also agrees to redo the assignment.

Students may request to participate twice in the Restorative Justice Process provided that there are at least three full semesters separating the violations.

In Restorative Justice, the severity and circumstances of a violation, as well as the severity of the consequences for that violation, depend upon the degree of premeditation, calculation and the potential impact of the act on the students or others’ grades. A student’s maturity level (as defined by the Restorative Justice Panel), is also a relevant factor in determining the consequences.

Traditional Disciplinary Process

The traditional disciplinary process uses clearly defined consequences to deter violations of academic integrity and to change the behavior of the student by assuring that future violations will receive more severe consequences.

Category A Violations include, but are not limited to:

  • Copying any minor assignment, such as a one-night homework assignment (not including tests or quizzes) assigned to be done independently. If it is not clear which student did the original work, and which student copied the work, both are guilty of a Category A violation.
  • Collaborating on a minor assignment in a manner inconsistent with the explicit and implicit expectations of the assignment for individual work.
  • Sharing work on a minor assignment with another student with the reasonable expectation and intention that the other student might plagiarize that work.

Category B Violations include, but are not limited to:

  • Any violation on a major assignment (such as Tests, Quizzes, Labs, Projects, Essays, assignments requiring multiple days to complete, etc.) that is consistent with the descriptions set forth in the Category A violations above.
  • Submitting plagiarized work, (other than copying a minor assignment as defined in Category A.) In the case of work plagiarized between students, if it is not clear which student did the original work, and which student plagiarized the work, both students are guilty of a Category B violation.
  • Looking at another student’s work or paper during an exam, test, or quiz.
  • Talking to or communicating with another student during an exam, test, or quiz.
  • Using any unauthorized material or device during an exam, test, or quiz (including translators, calculators, etc.).
  • Giving or receiving test information, in any form, to or from students in other periods of the same teacher or same course or from previous school years.
  • Repetitive lying or deception about completion or submission of work.

Category C Violations include, but are not limited to:

  • Altering a returned quiz, test or assignment with the purpose of deceiving the teacher about the student’s performance on that assignment.
  • Stealing (or photographing) exams, projects or assignments.
  • Altering grades on a computer database or in a grade book.
Category A
Consequences
Category B
or any second offense of A
Consequences

 
Category C
or any second offense of B
Consequences
  • Student receives a zero on the assignment
  • Student must redo the assignment to evaluate understanding of material (see below)
  • Teacher notifies parent (via email, phone call, or mail)
  • Teacher notifies administrator
  • Administrator logs first offense in discipline file and meets with the student to review the Academic Integrity Policy.
  • Student will be assigned Saturday School.
  • Teacher will require the student to redo the assignment under supervision at Saturday School and may earn partial credit.
  • If the student fails to complete the assignment further disciplinary action will ensue (which may include one or more of the following: in-school detentions, additional Saturday School detentions, or suspension) and the offense will be increased to a Category B violation
  • Student receives a zero on the assignment
  • Student must redo the assignment to evaluate understanding of material (see below)
  • Teacher notifies parent (via email, phone call or mail)
  • Teacher notifies administrator.
  • Administrator logs offense in discipline file and meets with the student to review the Academic Integrity Policy.
  • Student will be required to write a reflection and submit the reflection to administration.
  • Student becomes ineligible within the same year of the infraction for the California Scholarship Federation or any other academic or scholastic honor offered by the District.
  • Student’s teachers and teacher advisor is notified of the violation.
  • Student will be assigned Saturday School where the student may be required to complete an additional assignment that addresses the same skill or content objective being assessed by the initial assignment.
  • If the student fails to complete the assignment further disciplinary action will ensue (which may include one or more of the following: in-school detentions, additional Saturday School detentions, or suspension).
  • Student receives a zero on the assignment
  • Student must redo the assignment to evaluate understanding of material (see below).
  • Teacher notifies parent (via email, phone call or mail)
  • Teacher notifies administrator
  • Student will be suspended and/or recommended for expulsion
  • Administrator logs offense in discipline file and meets with the student to determine additional consequences, which may include being dropped from the class, being transferred to another class or program, completing a community service project related to academics or other appropriate consequences.
  • Student will be required to write a reflection and submit the reflection to administration.
  • Student’s teachers and teacher advisor is notified of the violation.
  • Student becomes ineligible throughout his or her high school career for the California Scholarship Federation or any other academic or scholastic honor offered by the District.
  • Counselors will report concerns about a student’s academic integrity in college recommendations when required by a college or university.

 

If a student is accused of a Violation of the Academic Integrity Policy, he or she may present evidence in his or her defense, and respond to any evidence presented in support of the accusation. Turnitin.com, the observations and testimony of teachers, staff and other students and any materials submitted by the student may be used to establish the facts of the case. Any attempt to alter the materials or testimony related to a case will automatically raise it to a Category C violation.

Process for Restorative Justice

Restorative Justice is a process intended to achieve two goals: genuine learning that leads to a change in behavior, and restoration for the wrongs done to individuals and the community affected by the individual’s actions.

The Restorative Justice panel will consist of a trained administrator or school representative; a trained peer; a person representing those harmed; the student; and the student’s parent/guardian or another adult.

The restorative process to address violations of Academic Integrity will be as follows

  1. The trained administrator or school representative will meet with the student and parent/guardian to provide an overview of the Restorative Justice process and to assure consent.
  2. The trained administrator or school representative will meet with the teacher of the student to assess whether or not he or she would like to participate in the Restorative Justice process. If the teacher would prefer not to participate, he or she will provide input to facilitate the process.
  3. The Restorative Justice meeting will be scheduled.
  4. The established facts of the violation will be reviewed.
  5. The individual speaking on behalf of those harmed by the violation, and others speaking as parties harmed by the violation, describe the nature of the harm done to them and the community.
  6. The student responds to the statements made by those harmed by the violation.
  7. The panel and the student have a moderated discussion by the trained administrator or school representative of the statements and the student’s response to determine that the student fully understands and accepts the nature of the harm done and his/her responsibility for actions that led to that harm. If there is no agreement at this stage (as determined by the trained facilitator), the sanctions of the Traditional Disciplinary process will be imposed.
  8. The student provides potential solutions to repair the harm presented.
  9. The panel and the student then have a moderated discussion of how the student can provide a satisfactory restoration for the harms done.
  10. All parties agree to a specific plan for the restoration of harms done, including dates for their completion. If the parties cannot agree to a specific plan for the restoration of harms done (as determined by the trained facilitator), the sanctions of the traditional discipline process will be imposed.

The administrator or school representative follows up to ensure that the agreements are completed. If the student does not complete the agreements by the specified dates, he/she is referred for additional discipline.